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Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
21
February 9, 2013 - 4:43 am

Hi Sharon, welcome to my web site. WOW, it sounds like you are really into WORM FARMING. I like your system and they are being fed like they are royalty. I have never given my worms cobs from corn. I always thought that it was way to big for them to eat fast. I will have to try it this Summer. I should treat my worms to some horse manure. The bigger the variety of food they eat, the more nutrients their castings will have. Thank you for the great ideas.

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

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sharon
Albemarle NC zone 7-8
4 Posts
(Offline)
22
February 9, 2013 - 8:04 am

Hi Lark, I don't take the corn off the cobs, If fresh corn I boil it, if I buy it frozen on the cob I let it set(1-2 weeks) in ziploc bags until corn is soft then I take my utility knife and cut down through each row of kernels. Before I scored it they took longer to get to the inside of kernels. The babies crawl inside the kernels. Once the corn is gone and only the cob is left the babies still crawl in. I am wondering if that is where the worms lay their cocoons. Try it, you will be amazed like I was. I could not believe how many worms were eating on it when I picked it up. They were hanging from it. Have to bury the corn cob very good so you don't get fruit flies. I bury it completely down in the bedding. I do the same with melon rinds also. I freeze the rinds to make sure there are no fruit flies and it softens what is left on the rinds.

How is your harvesting by migration going? I use that type of tote only mine aren't that deep. When I started I had a couple rubbermaid totes, I think they called them roughnecks. They are hard to find. I did find another one at Walmart a couple weeks ago, not RM but same size.

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atwater
2 Posts
(Offline)
23
June 26, 2013 - 8:04 pm

Hi, Lark.  I've been watching worm farm videos on youtube.  I like your methods the best because they are simple.  My worms came today so will start my first worm farm tomorrow.  Smile

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Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
24
June 26, 2013 - 8:14 pm

Welcome to my website, atwater.  Good luck with your worm farm.  I am in the process of harvesting castings from two of my worm farms. I am being lazy and using the 'MIGRATING METHOD' of getting the worms to go up to a new little tote.  Keep us informed on how your WORM FARM is doing. 

 

 

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

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atwater
2 Posts
(Offline)
25
June 28, 2013 - 6:38 pm

Well, I looked at my worms today and when I lifted the cardboard on top there were several earwigs on the bottom of the cardboard.  My worm bin is in my barn.  Will the earwigs hurt anything?  Should I try to get rid of them?  How should I get rid of them?

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Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
26
November 18, 2013 - 7:03 am

Now is a perfect time to give WORM FARMING a try. In the southern & western states, your temps are not so HOT any longer. Perfect for putting a WORM FARM somewhere in a shady spot of your yard. In the northern & eastern states you can still worm farm BUT inside your home. Mine is in my basement.

 

I no longer WORM FARM outdoors.  My basement is a perfect temp all year long, around 65 degrees. There is no smell. Being indoors I can ten them day or night.

 

Give WORM FARMING a try. Use the inexpensive tote method and see if you like it. If you like it, you might want to spend A LOT OF MONEY and get the commercial worm tower.  Either way... JUST DO IT.  The benefits of WORM POOP on your plants (indoors & outdoors) are numerous.  They are FREE & EASY.

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

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sharon
Albemarle NC zone 7-8
4 Posts
(Offline)
27
November 20, 2013 - 9:35 am

I have my worms in a new home. The storm demolished my greenhouse last summer so I got a 20x32 building. I have windows at one end for gardening and a skylight. The other end will be storage.

I have my worms in there on three shelving units. The units are on casters so easy to move. Two rubbermaid type worm bins per shelf. I use two center shelves as the bins get very heavy. the rest of the shelves I store garden stuff. I have a nice size cart to move them around, similair Lowes garden carts.

I am 71 with back problems so this setup works great. When time tp harvast I use the garden cart to move the bin to the bench accross the 20 foot they built under windows.

Hope this will help.

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Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
28
January 30, 2014 - 4:18 pm

During this Winter I am trying to have at least two worm farms going at one time.  I plan on starting at least two others. Total four worm farms.  Worms multiply quite quickly. You don't want an over population.  I don't know what TOO MUCH is, so when the worms start looking very thick in the bin I start a new one. I use a smaller tote with hardware cloth on the open bottom of the small tote. I put food in this small tote and place it in the larger highly populated tote. Put the cover on. Now the worms MIGRATE UP through the bottom of the small tote.  After a couple of days there are A LOT OF WORMS in this small migrating tote. I then dump this small tote into a new tote. WALLA new worm farm. With leaving the little tote (migrating tote) on the bigger tote for only two days, there are plenty of worms still left in the large tote and a lot of cocoons. This process keeps me from harvesting worms by hand to put into a new worm farm. MIGRATING WORM BIN is much easier for me. Hopefully by Spring I will have more WORM POOP than I know what to do with. O.K. O.K., I know exactly what I am going to do with it...make wonderful garden soil.  It all starts with the soil. 

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

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Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
29
February 27, 2014 - 12:00 pm

I have 3 worm farms in my basement.  They either have holes on the bottom or they have 1/4" hardware cloth on the bottom.  One is suspended on a structure much like saw horses. This allows better air circulation and it is also easier for me to work on.  The two that are placed on tote covers on the ground are 5-10 gallon totes. When they are filled of kitchen scraps and worm poop they become compacted and heavy. I checked the bottoms of the two totes on the floor and the bottoms were VERY WET.  So I added shredded newspaper and turned them over to allow the newspaper to absorb the liquid. I also will leave the covers off of the worm farms for a week. I do have a piece of cardboard over the top. Lucky they weren't sitting like that for too long.  If the become ANAEROBIC (smelly) the worms could die and the castings are not good any longer. BUT mine didn't have much of a smell. Soooooooooo Lark, remember to check your totes more often.

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

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