Avatar
Log In

Please consider registering
Guest

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Min search length: 3 characters / Max search length: 84 characters

Register Lost password?
Avatar
Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
11
October 9, 2011 - 5:07 am

If you haven't ever had a compost pile, NOW IS THE TIME TO START. I am always adding to my pile. Today I have a note to myself. GET A COUPLE LARGE BLACK POTS to use during the Winter months (when my compost pile is frozen)for my greens that I save under my sink. I also will be adding shredded junk mail, newspaper, paper towel, etc. One of the members (I think Silvester) uses & suggested this BLACK POT METHOD which helps heat up the stuff in the pot and breaks down faster. I will place this pot somewhere on garden soil.  Worms come up into the pot through the holes in the bottom of the pot. I will place a board of some kind on top of the pot that can be easily removed to add more greens & shredded paper. During the Winter here in Wisconsin I will share my kitchen scraps between my WORM FARM, COMPOST PILE & the BLACK POT METHOD.  I will see how this BLACK POT METHOD works for me.ConfusedCool

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

Avatar
Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
12
December 25, 2011 - 6:37 am

I went out to my compost pile yesterday. Threw back the black plastic covering the pile to look and see if I could get a fork into it, wiggled it back & forth, up & down to add air. It wasn't frozen.Surprised I didn't turn it because it is TOO MUCH WORK for me.Frown I saw RED WIGGLERS doing their thing...MUNCH MUNCH the compost pile is their LUNCH. Cool Now remember...I am in Wisconsin, which is usually a FROZEN TUNDRA by now. No such thing, 30 and sunshine all day. I am thinking the black plastic is attracting even more heat. I will periodically take the plastic off and let SOME rain or snow on the pile and then cover it up again...I don't want it TOO WET and leaching out all the good nutrients. I am not adding more kitchen scraps to the pile. With all my WINTER KITCHEN SCRAPS I am giving some to my worms (in the basement) and the others I am putting in old BLACK TREE/SHRUB POTS that I have in my veggie garden area. I put a board on top of the pots with a HEAVY ROCK on top so the critters can't get in. This way come Spring or maybe even now, the red wiggers that are in the earth can crawl up through the holes in the bottom of the BLACK POTS and do their thing...MUNCH, MUNCH the BLACK POT veggies is their LUNCH.LaughCool The BLACK POTS should attract more heat and maybe break down faster. Time will tell. You know me & my style of gardening...the school of TRIAL & ERROR.Confused

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

Avatar
Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
13
December 31, 2011 - 4:51 am

I pulled back the sheet of black plastic that I have covering my compost pile and let the rain soak the pile. I do have small holes in the black plastic, but I wanted the pile to get more saturated. I stuck a pitch fork into the pile deep and still found worms.Smile It did rain most of the day so it did get a soaking. In the afternoon  I went out and covered the compost pile and secured it with bricks. I know some of you are thinking that this is alot of work BUT it also is FREE BLACK GOLD. Just think of all the newspaper, kitchen scraps and yard/garden trimmings I am keeping out of the landfill.Confused I am not adding anymore stuff to this pile, just letting it break down. Here in Wisconsin (brrrrrrrrrrr) it takes awhile. It only gets a few hours of sun (if the sun is even out) a day. But you knowSmile we are getting one minute more of sunlight everyday and that is very kool Cool.

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

Avatar
Linjoy
Barbados, West Indies zone 11
12 Posts
(Offline)
14
February 13, 2012 - 1:07 am

Just a thought, what if you would dig a bunch of holes in a straight line, by your compost area, each hole deep, have a piece of plyboard long enough to sit over all the holes and a brick at each end so animals can't lift it. If a pile of dirt for covering the scraps freezes, try having a pile of sand to cover what scraps you put in to stop the animals from smelling it. If the holes are alittle deeper you can keep stacking the scraps and sprinkle just alittle sand ready for more scraps. That way you don't have to have so many holes. By spring you could just top off the holes with soil and start doing the regular compost pile again.  I used this basic hole digging cover up compost in Florida because I had no room for a compost pile. I would dig a few holes in areas that weren't too close to my plants, put my kitchen scraps in them after supper and cover. It is the easiest way to compost. What do you think about that thought?Confused

Avatar
Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
15
February 21, 2012 - 1:46 pm

Great idea, Lin. For now the BLACK POT METHOD is working for me. I can move the pots around if they get in the way.

The other day while the temps were in the 40's, I was able to remove the black plastic that I had covering my compost pile. I replaced it with clear plastic, which should heat up ALOT more.  I am definately thinking SPRING.

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

Avatar
Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
16
May 23, 2012 - 9:09 pm

Today I was sifting my compost. Absolutely beautiful!  I started this pile last Fall. So it took a good 8 months to break down and turn into this BLACK GOLD.  I put a 3" layer of this sifted compost on my 7'x7' veggie bed. It looks soooooooooooo pretty. I also used this compost for 60 plus annual plants (I started from seed) that I planted on my front sidewalk garden.  These plants are soooooooooo small. I sure hope the bunny I saw today doesn't eat them.Cry 

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

Avatar
Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
17
July 26, 2012 - 8:12 pm

My new compost pile, which was started in May, is down in a clearing in my woods. It does get sun.  The pile is growing HUGE fast, mostly green stuff. So for the brown matter I use shredded newspaper and water it sometimes (when I remember). I haven't turned it, due to it is sooooooooooo big and not cut up in little pieces.  Being that it is in the woods where there is A LOT OF WEED SEEDS floating around, I decided to cover it with clear plastic. I am thinking that this is really going to heat up and decompose quicker. Once it starts to decompose maybe I will be able to turn it a little. Add more water and cover it back up so the weed seeds don't get in my FUTURE COMPOST. Plus the heat should kill any weed seeds that do get in there, right???Confused

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

Avatar
Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
18
August 12, 2012 - 2:57 pm

DSC04160.JPGImage EnlargerHere is my late summer compost pile. I am trying the 'NO TURN' method. Check out the article on my HOMEPAGE.

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

Avatar
Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
19
October 26, 2012 - 7:24 am

I started another compost pile. We have a lot of chopped leaves and grass clippings. I keep both of the piles covered after a rain. Then when it needs more moisture, I uncover it until it gets soaked and cover it back up again. I find that the clear plastic helps hold the heat in, that is IF THE SUN IS SHINING. Sometimes I put my kitchen scraps on this pile, but the WORM FARM gets most of my kitchen scraps. Soon I will not be getting grass clippings, which is the green (nitrogen) addition, and I will be putting on HUMAN URINE for the nitrogen addition. I will be adding cardboard or newspaper, as the brown matter, when I no longer have dried leaves. I will do this process until we get a lot of SNOW.

 

Most of the FLOWER garden debris is being put in the area where I have the cattle/hog fencing arched. Remember this area? I planted in galvanized containers and used the arch for the vines to grow up. This area needs building up. It takes longer to break down, since it is more TWIGGY debris. After the winter snows and spring rains it is compacted. Then I will lay my cardboard down, with grass clippings or straw over the cardboard. Then it will look neat & tidy.  Wink

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

Avatar
Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2233 Posts
(Offline)
20
November 19, 2012 - 1:56 pm

I have two compost piles going. One 3 months older than the other. Today I uncovered the newest one, added fresh grass clippings (probably the last grass mowing of the season) and decided to turn the pile. The pile had real sunk down. I took a pitch fork to it and turned. I noticed that some of it was dry. Soooooooooooo I am keeping the newer compost pile UNCOVERED for a while. I will let it snow or rain on it, to get it more evenly wet...then cover it so all the nutrients don't leach out. ConfusedAs I have said before, "Gardening is one huge experiment for me". Embarassed Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. Confused

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

Forum Timezone: America/Chicago
All RSS Show Stats

Administrators:
Lark

Top Posters:

KeyWee54: 616

davsher: 284

Im A Dork Fish: 174

Brenda: 129

HSwantabe: 115

GardenLiv: 96

Newest Members:

AArbili

danusia

danielleoh2

wiltinrose

thewoodlandgardener

Christine

Forum Stats:

Groups: 8

Forums: 29

Topics: 641

Posts: 4050

 

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 0

Members: 392

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Most Users Ever Online: 88

Currently Online:
5 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)