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davsher
, zone 5
284 Posts
(Offline)
31
April 14, 2014 - 6:19 pm

I used both compost piles that I over wintered. used them in the above ground potato bed. laid sodden cardboard down first, covered it with about 3or4" of compost, then covered it wit a thick layer of newspaper. then put the potato eyes on the paper, then covered them with a heavy layer of the paper, then a good thick layer of straw, them covered that with the rest of the compost. then soaked it all down with water. then it got another soaking over the weekend by mother nature. have to put on a good heavy layer of sawdust to muddy to go right now. if I explained this before just disregard thisConfused  

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Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2249 Posts
(Offline)
32
August 15, 2014 - 9:26 pm

Building a healthy soil is the most important lesson one can learn.  No matter how large or small your yard/garden is you should be composting.

This time of the year my compost pile starts getting larger.  I add all my junk mail, newspaper, paper towel, cardboard for my 'brown' matter.  Kitchen scraps, coffee grounds, flowers, plants, cuttings, grass clippings, horse manure and my WONDERFUL comfrey leaves...all these are the green matter.  As soon as the leaves start falling that is my main source of 'brown' matter.  I water my compost pile as I add all this to it. Then I cover it with a plastic sheet.  I don't want it to get too wet. This way I can control it. This compost pile is a HOT PILE.  I try to turn it once a week.  Sometimes that doesn't happen.  Oh well...it will still break down into beautiful compost. 

 

Give composting a try. Big or small...JUST DO IT!

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

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Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2249 Posts
(Offline)
33
September 2, 2014 - 9:13 pm

Today I started my second compost pile. Grass clippings, shredded paper and kitchen scraps. I hope to have four piles by the end of Autumn.  Sure beats buying compost. 

Tomorrow I will stop at Star Bucks and hopefully get coffee grounds. This is a super thing to add to your compost pile.  I will add a little wood ash from our burn pile. Comfrey leaves will also be added. 

Start a compost pile now. You will be happy you did.  Smile

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

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davsher
, zone 5
284 Posts
(Offline)
34
September 3, 2014 - 9:40 am

we have 2 left one small one that will be full today after I finish mowing. the big one will hold all the garden debris and the fall leaves. happy composting! it's pure GOLDWink

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Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2249 Posts
(Offline)
35
October 10, 2015 - 7:06 am

Adding Comfrey leaves to the compost pile adds a lot of nutrients and minerals.  Which in turn will be added to your gardens or containers.  FREE fertilizer and organic. Win, win.  Yes, Comfrey is a plant that is hard to get rid of once planted.  CHOOSE WISELY where you plant this outstanding herb.  I think all gardeners should include this herb into their landscape.  And learn how to use it to your benefit.  I have several areas for this beauty.  One planting is located next to my compost piles.  Easy access.012.JPGImage Enlarger

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

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Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2249 Posts
(Offline)
36
February 28, 2016 - 5:25 pm

I went down to my compost piles today. They are covered with clear plastic. I wanted  to see if I could add some 'carbon, browns' to the pile.  SurprisedThe piles were NOT frozen.  I added my junk mail, paper, tea bags, paper towel the turned the pile over.  SurprisedI even found red wigglers.  The clear plastic helps heat up the piles early in Spring.  I don't think I will ever have too much compost.

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

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CarolJean
central Wisconsin
67 Posts
(Offline)
37
March 15, 2016 - 8:25 pm

I have another question Lark and it's about compost tea.  It was recommended to rake up all the old seed under your bird feeders so the birds don't eat moldy seed and get sick.  But the rabbits ate a lot of the seed on the ground and left behind droppings.  I don't want to waste the manure and thought I might put the entire mess in a bucket, add some water and brew some compost tea.  It includes lots of seed and seed shells, pine needles, maple seeds etc.   But if I strain it I think I can keep seed out of my beds.  What's your opinion?

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Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2249 Posts
(Offline)
38
March 16, 2016 - 8:57 am

My thinking is the birds know what to eat and what not to eat.  Seeds fall naturally from all our plants and we don't pick them up. Even if they have been on the ground for months or even a year.  Let nature take its course.  This might sound really OC BUT my husband suggested I use the 'shop vac' and vacuum most of the seed debris. It works GREAT.  Of course I wait until a sunny dry day and before the foliage of the plants start blooming.  Which means here in Wisconsin, probably next week. 

I just scatter the rabbit poop around the garden.  Gloves on and just through it around.  I don't know about compost tea with rabbit poop.  I would think you could use it.  I would YouTube 'rabbit poop tea' and see what some of these 'rabbit growers' do with it.  The seeds and debris I wouldn't use in my teas.

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

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Katie
Wisconsin, zone 5
29 Posts
(Offline)
39
May 18, 2017 - 8:30 pm

I started a compost bucket this year.  I've been putting coffee grounds, newspaper, over ripe fruits and veggies and scraps from fruits and veggies. Ive also added some plant trimmings here and there (though they are pretty scarce right now). I turn it every couple days.  I can feel the heat coming off It! Anything else I can add?

I'm hoping to start a pile in the fall. My neighbor has plenty of grass clippings, but we all fertilizer our yards so not sure if that's a good idea? What about bread (I make pb&j's for my kids and cut off the crust, but I thought I read you shouldn't compost that? Then again, I'm feeding it to my kids, so why not the garden!) I also don't add citrus or onions because your videos say the worms don't care for em but I'm not work farming (yet...), so I think it's ok? What about other food scraps, like gone-bad leftovers? I'm also nervous about adding pulled weeds as I don't want the seeds getting back in my garden. You mentioned Starbucks a couple times, do they give you coffee grounds for free? (Sorry for the 20 questions.....)

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Lark
Wisconsin zone 4/5
2249 Posts
(Offline)
40
May 19, 2017 - 8:14 am

Anything vegetarian can be added.  No dairy.  I don't add citrus or onions to my worm bin BUT outside is perfectly o.k.  I add weeds or 'chop & drop' BUT no weed seeds to the compost pile or ground mulch. Yes, check all the coffee shops for free grounds.  

Sooooooo nice to have Spring here.  BUT today is so windy and cold.

Dousman, Wisconsin, zone 5

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